Save the Date:
Symposium on 4th July 2019

Share your photos and make a difference…

The Naturelink Perth team is busy designing the web layout for all the information we are collating in our five topic areas (including Kaartdijin Noongar of course). Our task is to make the information as accessible as possible, to ensure it is used. Robert Bridges said: ‘Verily by beauty it is that we come at wisdom’. An attractive page engages the audience and entices them to stay a little longer – perhaps look for other beautiful images and then engage with what is written there. 

Are you willing to share some of your beautiful photos and make our website more effective? There are some amazing images out there: native flora and fauna, from spiders and fungi to flowers and birds. Not just species but also landscapes, people in nature anything relevant to NatureLink Perth from the exquisite to the quirky. If  you are willing to share please send your photos to NatureLinkPerth@murdoch.edu.au. The link provides text that gives permission and conditions for NatureLink Perth to display your photos. We hope you can help make our website stunning and thereby more effective. 

 

 Help us find the right questions…

“If I had an hour to solve a problem and my life depended on the solution, 
I would spend the first 55 minutes determining the proper question to ask… 
for once I know the proper question, I could solve the problem in less than five minutes.” Albert Einstein 

We are embarking on a quest to find out: What needs to be done to get a sustainable network of natural assets across Perth? 

The Naturelink Perth team are currently designing the interactive symposium and workshop on the 4-5th July 2019. To get the right answers, we need to ask the right questions. We have been asking people (see the newsletter below) what are the right questions to solve the challenge of biodiversity loss across Perth. This Easter perhaps you might like to spend a moment tackling the puzzle below…. Please send your questions to: naturelinkperth@murdoch.edu.au

Background information: about biodiversity hotspots…

Biodiversity hotspots  

• support natural ecosystems that are largely intact.  
• have high diversity of locally endemic species, 
• with species that are not or rarely found outside the hotspot.

The current, planned or potential management activities in hotspots 

• place the natural values at risk, 
• likely that the risk will increase in future 
• in the absence of active conservation management.

Because the natural values of hotspots are largely intact, 

• undertaking action now to maintain these values 
• has the potential to provide value-for-money biodiversity conservation.

From : https://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/conservation/hotspots

Statement to consider:

Perth is in a biodiversity hotspot.

We are losing our natural areas to development such that species and whole ecosystems are now threatened and may be extinct in future.

This is occurring despite the multiple benefits nature provides us in the urban landscape

Question?
What is the question that needs to be answered to solve this challenge?
You may also like to comment on whether the statement is worded correctly.
Please send your questions and comments to: naturelinkperth@murdoch.edu.au 

Events

Upcoming events are provided here. Do you have an event coming up? Let us know.

So much happening at the moment! The Woyllie Walk at Whiteman Park is on again on 24 April – see previous newsletter for details.

Bibra Bat Stalk 

Hosted by The Wetlands Centre, Cockburn
Get Wild about Wetlands Program
 (for 5-12 yrs) 
DATE: Thursday 24 April | 6:00pm–8:00pm
VENUE: The Wetland Centre, Cockburn, 184 Hope Rd Bibra Lake
COST: $5 child (adults free).
To book click Here

Join our local bat expert Joe Tonga for an informative talk about the local bats at Bibra Lake. Enjoy a dusk stalk and hopefully see the bats flying through the trees and using our specially constructed bat boxes. Please bring a torch and wear closed in shoes and trousers. 

Autumn Walk -Rehabilitating Roe 8

Hosted by the Wildflower Society of WA Murdoch Branch and 
The Wetlands Centre, Cockburn
DATE: Saturday 27 April | 9:00am-11:00am
VENUE: The Wetland Centre, Cockburn, 184 Hope Rd Bibra Lake
COST: Gold coin donation
To book click Here

Following on from a recent feature on Gardening Australia about Rehabilitating Roe 8, Murdoch Branch will run a series of walks in 2019 in different parts of the Roe 8 corridor, to see regeneration of the bush. Please join us for a guided walk to learn about the flora and fauna of this special place and hear about progress to rehabilitate the habitat corridor. Park and meet at Cockburn Wetland Centre and then we will cross the road for the walk. We will end with morning tea at the Wetland Centre.Difficulty: Moderate – long walk in deep sands. Not appropriate for prams. Please bring water and sun protection.

Tuarts and Banksia Count

Brought to you by Cockburn Community Wildlife Corridor
DATE: Sunday 28 April | 7:30am- 9:30am
VENUE:
South West corner Stock Road and Forrest Road, Hamilton Hill
COST:  Free
To book click Here

The season is Djeran and the Banksia menziesii is in flower in our corridor. Please join us for a morning of ‘counting’ (GPS mapping) Tuarts and Banksias and hand weeding in the Forrest rd Stock rd bushland. Tools and morning tea will be provided.

In the News:

Research shows the imperative linkages needed to retain biodiversity. Not in Perth but the concept is the same… 

Australia’s burrowing bilbies help other species survive 
Murdoch University   16 April 2019

New research has revealed that vulnerable bilbies are important for whole ecosystems of smaller animals in the West Kimberley region.

What we can learn from another Australian city’s experience: 

What Australia can learn from Victoria’s shocking biodiversity record

The Conversation Geoff Wescott  21 March 2019

Victoria is struggling with biodiversity conservation, according to a State of the Environment report tabled in parliament this week. While the scorecard is bleak – not one of the state’s key biodiversity indicators ranks as “good” – the report itself gives some hope.

Hi everyone,

 

Thanks for your interest in NatureLink Perth.  Actions you can take are highlighted by a resources with a 
 
On Monday, Jane Chambers presented at the Urban Bushland Council‘s April meeting. It was great meeting – full of energy and ideas. We tackled the question challenge described above and there were many insightful questions raised – so thank you to the many people and ‘Friends of’ groups present. 

We met also met with Ingrid Sieler, Community Engagement Manager of Perth NRM. We discussed the excellent work Perth NRM does to facilitate natural resource management in Perth and the critical importance of coordination in this space. I love the way our network grows with each meeting and I learned about further connections as Ingrid shed light on yet more stakeholders in this space.

On Thursday we met with Mark Batty, Executive Manager of Environmental and Waste at the WA Local Government Association (WALGA). We talked about the Perth Biodiversity Program which (although it is no longer funded, since August 2014) still provides a wealth of resources for biodiversity in Perth including the Environmental Planning Tool .

 

We discussed a suite of initiatives with possibilities to improve biodiversity conservation and nature sensitive urban design from the Strategic Assessment of the Perth and Peel Region to urban forest and biodiversity strategies. 

Hope you have a good break over Easter – try our question challenge and as always please email us any information you have, people you think we should contact or events/activities that are happening – so we can share with everyone through NatureLink Perth and make all of us more effective agents of change.

 

Cheers,

Jane and the NatureLink Perth team